Oklahoma

State Score: 42% (16.00 / 38.5)
Rank: Tied For 12nd
 WBTi United States and Territories 2017 Baseline Report   

What does WBTi assessment show us?

The World Breastfeeding Trends Initiative (WBTi) aims to stimulate action, not simply to collect information. Having more information is not helpful unless there are strategies in place for translating the information into tools for change and for taking action to improve the situation. The WBTi aims to stimulate research, investigation, ask questions, and find out why optimal infant and young child feeding (IYCF) does or does not occur. It offers an opportunity for comprehensive analysis to stimulate action for change.

To see the full national report for the United States, please visit:
http://www.worldbreastfeedingtrends.org/GenerateReports/report/WBTi-United-States-2016.pdf

To see the full state report for Oklahoma, please visit: https://www.wbtiusa.org

Optimal IYCF is one of the ways to decrease infant and maternal mortality.

CHARTS/NUMBERS

INDICATOR 1

Is there a statewide policy that protects, promotes, and supports optimal IYCF/breastfeeding and if so, is the policy supported by a government program?

Is there a mechanism to coordinate the statewide IYCF committee and a state-employed coordinator for the committee?
Criteria
Results
1.1) A statewide infant and young child feeding (IYCF)/breastfeeding policy has been officially adopted/approved by the government. (1)
1.00
1.2) The policy recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months, complementary feeding to be started after six months and continued breastfeeding up to 2 years and beyond. (1)
1.00
1.3) A statewide plan of action has been developed based on the policy. (2)
0.00
1.4) The plan is adequately funded. (2)
0.00
1.5) There is a Statewide Breastfeeding Committee/ IYCF Committee. (1)
1.00
1.6) The statewide breastfeeding/IYCF committee meets, monitors, and reviews progress on a regular basis. (1.5)
0.00
1.7) The statewide breastfeeding/IYCF committee links effectively with all other sectors like health, nutrition, information etc. (.5)
0.00
1.8) There is a state-employed breastfeeding coordinator with a clearly defined role, including regularly communicating statewide policy. (1) (WIC only .5)
0.50
Total Score
3.5/10

WBTiExpert Panel convened by Healthy Children Project, Inc.

www.centerforbreastfeeding.org



Oklahoma
State Score: 42% (16.00 / 38.5)
Rank: Tied For 12nd
 WBTi United States and Territories 2017 Baseline Report   
INDICATOR 4

Are there laws or other measures that meet or go beyond the International Labor Organization (ILO) standards for protecting and supporting breastfeeding mothers, including those working mothers in the informal sector?
Criteria
Results
4.1) Women covered by state legislation are allowed the following weeks of paid maternity leave: any leave less than 14 wks (.5), 14-17 wks (1), 18-25 wks (1.5), or 26 wks or more (2).
0.00
4.2) Women covered by state legislation are allowed at least one breastfeeding break or reduction of work hours daily: unpaid break (.5) or paid break (1).
0.00
4.3) State legislation requires private sector employers of women in the state to: give at least 14 wks paid maternity leave (.5) and/or paid nursing breaks (.5)
0.00
4.4) There is provision in state legislation that provides for worksite accommodation for breastfeeding and/or childcare in work places in the formal sector: space for breastfeeding/breastmilk expression (.5) and/or onsite daycare (.5).
0.00
4.5) Women in informal/unorganized and agriculture sector are: accorded some protective measures (.5) or accorded the same protection as women working in the formal sector (1).
0.00
4.6) Information about maternity protection laws, regulations, or policies is made available to workers (.5) and/or there is a system for monitoring compliance and a way for workers to complain if their entitlements are not provided (.5).
0.50
4.7) Paternity leave is granted in public sector for at least 3 days (.5) and/or in the private sector for at least 3 days (.5).
0
Total Score
0.5/8.5
INDICATOR 9

Are policies and programs in place to ensure that mothers, infants, and young children will be provided adequate protection for IYCF during emergencies?
Criteria (0-No, 1-Some Degree, 2-Yes)
Results
9.1) The state has a comprehensive policy on infant and young child feeding that includes infant feeding in emergencies (IFE) and contains all basic elements included in the IFE Operational Guidance. (0,1,2)
0.00
9.2) Person(s) tasked with responsibility for statewide coordination with all relevant partners such as the Red Cross, FEMA, state EMA, donors, military and NGOs regarding infant and young child feeding in emergency situations have been appointed. (0,1,2)
1.00
9.3) An emergency preparedness and response plan based on the practical steps listed in the Operational Guidance has been developed and put into effect in most recent emergency situations. (0,1,2)
0.00
9.4) Resources have been allocated for implementation of the emergency preparedness and response plan. (0,1,2)
2.00
9.5) Appropriate orientation and training material on infant and young child feeding in emergencies has been integrated and is taking place in pre-service and in-service training for emergency management and relevant health care personnel. (0,1,2).
0.00
Total Score
3/10
INDICATOR 10

Are monitoring and evaluation systems in place that routinely collect, analyze, and use data to improve IYCF practices?
Criteria (0-No, 1-Some Degree, 2-Yes)
Results
10.1) Monitoring and evaluation components are built into major infant and young child feeding program activities. (0,1,2)
2.00
10.2) Data/information on progress made in implementing the IYCF program are used by program managers to guide planning and investments decisions. (0,1,2)
2.00
10.3) Data on progress made in implementing IYCF program activities routinely collected at statewide levels. (0,1,2)
2.00
10.4) Data/information related to infant and young child feeding program progress are reported to key decision-makers. (0,1,2)
1.00
10.5) Monitoring of key infant and young child feeding practices is integrated into the statewide nutritional surveillance system, and/or health information system or statewide health surveys. (0,1,2)
2.00
Total Score
9/10

WBTiExpert Panel convened by Healthy Children Project, Inc.

www.centerforbreastfeeding.org   



Oklahoma
Sources and Comments    
 WBTi United States and Territories 2017 Baseline Report   
Indicator
1.1
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/health/Community_&_Family_Health/Breastfeeding/index.html
2. https://www.ok.gov/health/Community_&_Family_Health/Breastfeeding/Oklahoma_Breastfeeding_Laws/index.html
Comment(s)
1. "The Oklahoma State Department of Health encourages actions that ? promote, protect, and support breastfeeding and the health of all? Oklahoma children."
2. Oklahoma has breastfeeding laws to protect breastfeeding in ? public and to give unpaid time to breastfeed at work.
1.2
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/health/Community_&_Family_Health/Breastfeeding/index.html
2. https://www.ok.gov/health2/documents/BF-BFing%202020%20Objectives.pdf
Comment(s)
1. The policy is to work to achieve the Healthy People 2020 goals, ? which have goals for exclusivity. Complementary feeding is ? implied. Breastfeeding to 2 and beyond is not included.
2. "The Oklahoma State Department of Health is working to achieve ? the goals set by Healthy People 2020, through breastfeeding ? promotion, education and support to health care providers, OSDH ? staff and the community."
1.3
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/health/Community_&_Family_Health/Breastfeeding/index.html
Comment(s)
1. No policy found
1.4
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/health/Community_&_Family_Health/Breastfeeding/index.html
Comment(s)
1. No policy found
1.5
Source(s)
1. http://www.okbreastfeeding.org/
Comment(s)
1. Coalition of Oklahoma Breastfeeding Advocates
1.6
Source(s)
1. http://www.okbreastfeeding.org/
Comment(s)
1. Although it appears the coalition meets regularly, it is not ? clear that they monitor or review progress
1.7
Source(s)
1. http://www.okbreastfeeding.org/
Comment(s)
1. It is not clear from the website whether the members represent or? link different sectors
1.8
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/health/Community_&_Family_Health/Breastfeeding/
Comment(s)
1. Although there is a WIC breastfeeding coordinator, there does not? seem to be a state breastfeeding coordinator
4.1
Source(s)
1. https://www.dol.gov/wb/maps/
Comment(s)
1. No additional protections to federal law.
4.2
Source(s)
1. https://www.dol.gov/wb/state_protection_summary_508_txt.htm
2. http://www.oscn.net/applications/OCISWeb/DeliverDocument.asp?CiteID=447234
Comment(s)
1. Federal protections only
4.3.a
Source(s)
1. https://www.dol.gov/wb/state_protection_summary_508_txt.htm
Comment(s)
1. Only federal protections apply
4.3.b
Source(s)
1. https://www.dol.gov/wb/state_protection_summary_508_txt.htm
Comment(s)
1. Only federal protections apply
4.4.a
Source(s)
1. https://www.dol.gov/wb/state_protection_summary_508_txt.htm
2. http://www.oscn.net/applications/OCISWeb/DeliverDocument.asp?CiteID=447234
Comment(s)
1. OK Statute Title 40, Chapter 10, Section 435 states: "B. An ? employer may make a reasonable effort to provide a private, ? secure, and sanitary room or other location in close proximity to? the work area, other than a toilet stall, where an employee can ? express her milk or breast-feed her child."
4.4.b
Source(s)
1. https://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/pdf/2016breastfeedingreportcard.pdf
Comment(s)
1. Data on employer provision of onsite daycare was not found.
4.5
Source(s)
1. https://www.dol.gov/wb/maps/
Comment(s)
1. Only federal protections
4.6.a
Source(s)
1. https://www.dol.gov/wb/state_protection_summary_508_txt.htm
2. https://www.ok.gov/odol/Transparency___Rules/Agency_Rules/index.html
Comment(s)
1. Okla. Stat. tit. 25,  1301; Okla. Admin. Code  335:15-3-9. ? Okla. Admin. Code  335:15-3-9.
2. Some state protections for pregnancy, employers "may" provide ? unpaid nursing breaks, not easily accessible
3. unclear if workers are made aware
4.6.b
Source(s)
1. https://www.dol.gov/wb/state_protection_summary_508_txt.htm
2. https://www.ok.gov/odol/documents/PEOSHComplaintForm.pdf
Comment(s)
1. Unclear if employers are required to make available
4.7
Source(s)
1. http://family.findlaw.com/paternity/paternity-leave.html
2. http://www.nationalpartnership.org/research-library/work-family/paid-leave/state-paid-family-leave-laws.pdf
Comment(s)
1. Only federal protections
4.8
Source(s)
1. http://family.findlaw.com/paternity/paternity-leave.html
2. http://www.nationalpartnership.org/research-library/work-family/paid-leave/state-paid-family-leave-laws.pdf
Comment(s)
1. Only federal protections
4.9
Source(s)
1. https://www.dol.gov/wb/state_protection_summary_508_txt.htm
2. https://www.ok.gov/odol/Transparency___Rules/Agency_Rules/index.html
Comment(s)
1. Okla. Stat. tit. 25,  1301; Okla. Admin. Code  335:15-3-9. ? Okla. Admin. Code  335:15-3-9.
2. Some state protections for pregnancy, employers "may" provide ? unpaid nursing breaks, not easily accessible
4.10
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/oag/documents/OCRE%20-%20Title%20VII%20-%20Disability%20Discrimination%20Brightmire.pdf
Comment(s)
1. Unclear whether job protection is included; also unclear whether ? law applies to breastfeeding period.
2. Oklahoma prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of sex,? defined to include pregnancy, childbirth or related medical ? conditions. This applies to all employers except employers of ? domestic workers.
9.1
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/OEM/
Comment(s)
1. No policy found
9.2
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/OEM/
Comment(s)
1. Statewide coordination of organizations, assuming infants are ? citizens of OK
9.3.a
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/OEM/
Comment(s)
1. No evidence found
9.3.b
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/OEM/
Comment(s)
1. No evidence found
9.4
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/OEM/
Comment(s)
1. Appears to be well funded
9.5.a
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/OEM/
Comment(s)
1. No evidence found
9.5.b
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/OEM/
Comment(s)
1. No evidence found
10.1
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/health/County_Health_Departments/Johnston_County_Health_Department/WIC/index.html
Comment(s)
1. This state has one major infant and young child feeding program, ? Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and ? Children (WIC). Into the WIC program are built monitoring and ? evaluation components.
10.2
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/health/County_Health_Departments/Johnston_County_Health_Department/WIC/index.html
Comment(s)
1.
10.3
Source(s)
1. https://www.ok.gov/health/County_Health_Departments/Johnston_County_Health_Department/WIC/index.html
Comment(s)
1.
10.4
Source(s)
1. https://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/wic-program
Comment(s)
1. All states report program data to UDSA office. USDA is ? considered the key-decision maker. The majority of the ? information reported is program data ie client participation and ? program costs.
10.5
Source(s)
1. https://www.cdc.gov/prams/index.htm
2. https://www.ok.gov/health/Community_&_Family_Health/Maternal_and_Child_Health_Service/Data_and_Evaluation/The_Oklahoma_Toddler_Survey_(TOTS)/
Comment(s)
1. "The Oklahoma Toddler Survey (TOTS) is a two-year follow-back ? survey to the Oklahoma Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring ? System (PRAMS), and was created by Oklahoma in 1994. TOTS ? re-surveys PRAMS respondents the month the child turns two years ? old. The purpose of TOTS is to learn about the health and well ? being of Oklahoma's toddler population and their health ? experiences from birth to age two. The information is used to ? help guide programs and health policy in Oklahoma, and to help ? make better use of limited resources." (from source 2 above)

WBTiExpert Panel convened by Healthy Children Project, Inc.

www.centerforbreastfeeding.org